US cybersecurity policy director joins FTI Consulting

FTI Consulting, Inc., based in Washington, DC, announced on September 11 that Cheryl Davis, former director for cybersecurity policy at the U.S. National Security Council and principal director of cyber policy at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, has joined the firm’s cross-segment cybersecurity team as a managing director in its Technology segment.

Davis, who will be based in Washington, D.C., served as a senior cybersecurity policy advisor to the Trump and Obama administrations and led the development of whole-of-government responses to malicious cyber activity that threatened the United States and its allies. Davis joins a growing cybersecurity offering at FTI Consulting and will work directly with senior managing director Anthony Ferrante, who is the former director for cyber incident response at the U.S. National Security Council.

At FTI Consulting, Davis will assist corporate and government clients with threat prevention, incident response and remediation, system architecture and design, privacy notifications and programs, IT strategy, governance, program assessment and data security.

“Cheryl delivers the complete package of cybersecurity leadership, innovation and action. She has worked across the U.S. government to implement policies that shield our nation from foreign threats and infrastructure failures, facilitate cross-border cybersecurity agreements, further cyber technical innovation and protect private industry,” said Sophie Ross, global chief executive officer of the Technology segment at FTI Consulting. “As corporations respond to an increasingly large and varied number of cyber threats, experience such as Cheryl’s becomes vital in helping them protect against cyber incidents and implement strategies to decrease future exposure.”

Ferrante added, “I have had the pleasure of serving in two presidential administrations with Cheryl and working alongside her to protect the United States against complex cyber threats. Her experience collaborating with agencies both domestically and internationally will be a tremendous asset to corporations and law firms as they work to counter these threats and safeguard their systems.”

As a lead advisor on U.S.-China cyber matters, Davis coordinated the implementation of the bilateral U.S.-China Four Point Agreement, which set the rules for theft of intellectual property by nation-state actors. Davis also worked across multiple branches of government, including the White House, law enforcement, national and domestic security bodies and various government agencies to develop and implement tools and policies used to meet critical cyber challenges and threats.

Before joining the Department of Homeland Security in 2012, Davis served on the staff of the Office of the U.S. Secretary of Defense. She focused on cyber and intelligence policy issues, including those integral to the establishment of the U.S. Cyber Command, which plans, synchronizes and conducts activities related to military cyberspace operations.

“We live in an era of unprecedented data accessibility, movement and vulnerability in both the corporate and government spheres,” Davis said. “Organizations are more open than ever to cyber threats that continue to evolve on a daily basis. I am excited to work with an expert team to help clients protect against and respond to these events.”

Source: FTI Consulting

  • avatar
    Mike Beuster
    September 12, 2017 - 5:34 pm

    US cybersecurity policy director joins FTI Consulting
    SEPTEMBER 12, 2017 BY LOREN BLINDE –

    RE: Davis, As a lead advisor on U.S.-China cyber matters, Davis coordinated the implementation of the bilateral U.S.-China Four Point Agreement, which set the rules for theft of intellectual property by nation-state actors. Davis also worked across multiple branches of government, including the White House, law enforcement, national and domestic security bodies and various government agencies to develop and implement tools and policies used to meet critical cyber challenges and threats.

    Mr. Blinde: Please ask Ms. Cheryl Davis Davis –

    Question #1 – What has the Chinese (‘Deep Panda’ and China’s main military intelligence service that has been linked to cyber attacks the Third Department of the General Staff, or 3PLA, which conducts cyber warfare) done with my March 1997- SF86, Nov 2001 – SF86, Sep 2006 – SF86 Security Clearance Background information in their OPM Hack along with 22+ million other Americans private? information. ”http://freebeacon.com/national-security/fbi-alert-reveals-groups-behind-opm-hack/

    Question #2 : has Ex- President Obama, Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch and Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, together with Chinese State Councilor and Minister of the Ministry of Public Security Guo Shengkun tried to cover the OPM hack up?

    Question #3 – Why didn’t OPM Head and her CIO go to jail instead of being allowed to retire?

    Question #4 – Why did the FBI not mention the OPM Hack when they arrested Yu Pingan?

    NOTE: Dan Tentler, founder of cybersecurity firm Phobos Group argued that the government’s obsession with compliance to appease lawmakers and auditors alike is lazy, and doesn’t fundamentally make their systems any more secure. His security firm, which has a business interest in penetration testing and red-teaming, preaches that best practices and security compliance tend to be bare-minimum efforts, and should not dictate how security operates.
    “The reason [the attack on] OPM happened is because people didn’t care about security. People did the barest minimum. And even when people aren’t qualified, they refuse to let qualified people in, and they don’t want to admit they have problems,” he said.
    Other government departments, he said, are heading in the same direction.
    “The Pentagon has created a circumstance where the good guys can’t find the problems because we’re not allowed to scan, or go out of scope, or find things on our own,” he said. “But the bad guys can scan whatever they want, for as long as they want, and exploit whatever they feel like.”
    “Well, Russia and China don’t care,” he added. “You can bet they’re scanning those networks.”

    NOTE: OPM HACK Girard Gibbs as Lead Counsel filed a complaint on March 14, 2016. The complaint is filed on behalf of “All current, former, and prospective employees of the federal government and its contractors, and their family members and cohabitants, whose sensitive personal information was compromised as a result of the breaches of OPM’s electronic information systems in 2014 and 2015 or the breach of KeyPoint’s electronic information systems in 2013 and 2014.

    Respectfully yours,

    Mike Beuster
    Blairsville, GA

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